Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Delivered to your inbox! If by desert I cannot get, 6. Learn more. *:The frizzle-headed man-eaters were loath to leave their fleshpots so long as the harvest of human carcases was plentiful. Merriam-Webster dictionaries record loathe (along with loth) as a variant spelling for the adjective, at the same time indicating that the spelling with an e is not as common as the form without it. * This spelling had more currency in the US in the 19th century, appearing in Webster's 1828 dictionary, but not the 1913 edition. When you are unwilling to do something, you are loathing it (without an e). Loath is an adjective that means reluctant or unwilling. Inflections of 'loathe' (v): (⇒ conjugate) loathes v 3rd person singular loathing v pres p verb, present participle: -ing verb used descriptively or to form progressive verb--for example, "a singing bird," "It is singing." I found this sentence in a wire service story Monday: Being a wine lover, she is loathe to pick just one, though. Loath vs. Loathe. willing, keen, anxious, eager, enthusiastic, avid, desirous Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. “Loath” is what we needed here. loathe meaning: 1. to hate someone or something: 2. to hate someone or something: 3. to feel strong hate…. It also focuses on aversion or dislike. Learn more. loathe (v.) Old English laðian "be hateful or displeasing," from lað "hated; hateful" (see loath). Examples: She will eat just about anything, but she loathes celery. Both loath and loathe may be traced back to the Old English word lath (“hostile, loathsome”). Loath means unwilling. What does loath mean? Redefine your inbox with Dictionary.com updates. The popular musical Wicked uses the gerund form of loathe (loathing) in its song “What is This Feeling?” It’s a strong word that helps the lyrics capture the characters’ sense of disgust and repulsion: Bonus: the adjective loathsome, which means offensive or repellent. It can be easy to mix up loath and loathe because of their extremely similar spellings, but here’s the difference: Loath is an adjective that means reluctant. Loathe is extensively used for simple distaste. (verb) The politician was loath to admit that he had taken the bribe. Loathe comes from the word laðian meaning to hate, to be disgusted with while loath comes from the word lað meaning hostile or spiteful. When you hate something with all your heart and soul, be it a person, you loathe it (with an e). Loath is pronounced with a soft -th sound at the end, rhyming with both or growth. I found this sentence in a wire service story Monday: Being a wine lover, she is loathe to pick just one, though. 52+1 sentence examples: 1. loathe - Translation to Spanish, pronunciation, and forum discussions. The fact that both words carry negative connotations also makes it … 4. The verb loathe descends from Middle English lothen, from Old English lāthian. Loathe is a verb (“to dislike greatly”). Biden projected 46th President. The words “loathe” and “loath” seem to give writers trouble. The little girl was loath to leave her mother. Loathe is a transitive verb that means to be disgusted with. It can also be translated as "to hate intensely." 5. Loath vs. loathe (vs. loth) Loathe is a verb meaning to dislike greatly. The related adjective loathsome means "hateful or disgusting," and the adjective loath means "not willing to do something," as in "I'm loath to cheat on a test, but I don't see what choice I have." It can be easy to mix up loath and loathe because of their extremely similar spellings, but here’s the difference: Loath is an adjective that means reluctant. Many usage commentators point out that the spelling of loath the adjective is distinct from loathe, the verb that means "to dislike greatly." Loath is an adjective equivalent to unwilling or reluctant. The adjective loath is used to describe being extremely opposed to something. The easiest way to tell the difference between these words is to check how they’re used in a sentence. 9 Trump moments Europeans loved to loathe Over the years, the US president never failed to surprise — and often entertain. loathe to hate somebody/ something very much: They loathe each other. Ex – He despised orthodox methods of punishing children. It is unlikely that this information would change the way you use loath and loathe, and it would either muddy things up, or make the tattoo you’re getting quite a bit longer. For example: "No wonder my child loathes his food; I'm loath to try it myself.". What’s The Difference Between Atheism And Agnosticism? Despise usually indicates finding something offensive or morally objectionable. I am loath to loathe. Loathe is a verb that means hate or feel disgusted by. Find more ways to say loathe, along with related words, antonyms and example phrases at Thesaurus.com, the world's most trusted free thesaurus. Latest Posts. When you are unwilling to do something, you are loathing it (without an e). Despitae the screams from Meghan's fans, it wasn't always this way. Many people use it to express an emotion even stronger than hate. —Heinrich Bullinger, Fiftie Godlie and Learned Sermons, 1577, But hap what will my heart is sette The People’s Choice 2020 Word Of The Year: 2020 Was A $#@#%%$@! “College” vs. “University”: Are They Synonyms? This is the key difference … Can we not meet at Manchester?” Here, Johnson is reluctant to travel a great distance to meet his friend, and uses the adjective loath to express his feelings. You are the one who I am loath to bully. What’s The Difference Between “Yule” And “Christmas”? Sometimes, when the harvest was too plentiful, they imposed on the missionaries by letting the word slip out that on such a day there would be a killing and a barbecue. Apostrophes and loathing are not equivalent. This is the key difference … Loath Loath is an adjective meaning "unwilling." The apostrophe is a treacherous syntactical fen, with its function, and the rules governing its use, shifting repeatedly over the centuries. loath definition: 1. to be unwilling to do something: 2. to be unwilling to do something: 3. unwilling; reluctant: . You are loath to confront the guy at work who keeps stealing your food from the refrigerator, because he often talks to himself and has a peculiar smell.